Category Archives: Pediatric Feature

November 2017

Cutting edge: Treatment for kids goes high tech

From a skateboard-like motion-sensing device that helps infants with CP learn to crawl to powered exoskeletons that sync with muscles to new advanced-imaging views of motor and sensory processing, technology for pediatric care is on the move. Here are some of the highlights.

By Hank Black

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November 2017

Firm foundation: Better balance for young patients

Children with neurological conditions often have balance issues, and healthy kids can struggle, too. Interventions should be tail­ored to their short attention spans and need for feedback, and include devices that improve alignment and stability and training to enhance strength and equilibrium.

By P.K. Daniel

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August 2017

ITW update: Etiological clues, collaborative care

Researchers still haven’t unraveled the ‘I’ in ITW, or idiopathic toe walking, but studies continue to point to neurodevelopmental  and genetic links. Here, we review recent literature and experts explain how they assess patients’ history and biomechanics for information to guide treatment.

By Larry Hand

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August 2017

Growth plates and injury in skeletally immature athletes

In this follow-up to “Growth-plate injuries: A diagnostic challenge,” (May, page 15) we continue our look at physeal trauma, exploring growth-plate issues in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and further examining these injuries’ impact on the knees, ankles, and feet of youth athletes.

By Shalmali Pal

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May 2017

Fine-tuning orthotic device prescription, fitting in CP

The heterogeneity of cerebral palsy means individual responses to orthotic devices vary widely. Moving beyond standardized  care to match orthotic prescriptions to each child’s unique gait issues, as well as to their individual footwear needs, however, will likely improve outcomes for all.

By P.K. Daniel

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May 2017

Growth-plate injuries: a diagnostic challenge

Physeal trauma can be hard to spot, and mismanagement can disturb normal development and lead to lower extremity issues,  such as limb-length discrepancy and  abnormal biomechanics. A thorough clinical exam, including details of the moment of injury, is often key to accurate diagnosis.

By Shalmali Pal

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February 2017

Flatfoot questions: Risk factors and assessment

The proposed association between obesity and pediatric flexible flatfoot (PFF) may depend more on the reliance on subjective, 2D footprint-based assessments than true correlation. And recent research has identified another potential risk factor, whole body and joint hypermobility.

By Hank Black

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February 2017

Early athletic specialization: Misconceptions and hazards

Most elite athletes didn’t concentrate on one sport as adolescents, and there’s a strong link between early sport specialization and physical injury and emotional burnout. Yet, many parents think this risky path is the only route to high achievement and college scholarships.

By P.K. Daniel

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November 2016

Therapeutic play plus O&P care is a win-win for kids

O&P practitioners are working with recreational therapists to open doors to leisure activities for kids with lower extremity issues and other disabilities. By expanding their playtime experiences and skills, kids can boost their physical activity, mobility, self-confidence, and social connections.

By Brigid Elsken Galloway

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November 2016

Path of least resistance: Sequencing orthotic care

The higher profile the device, the more it perturbs movement, and sometimes kids reject such orthoses because of discomfort or unwieldiness. Starting with the least restrictive device and responding to subtle changes in children’s orthotic needs may improve outcomes and compliance.

By Hank Black

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