Category Archives: Issues

From the Editor: Bridging the Gap

For a parent, the only thing more frustrating than knowing something isn’t quite right with your young child is hearing that nothing can be done until the underlying cause of the symptoms is identified. Luckily, parents of children with hypotonia can be spared the latter frustration.

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Posted in SureStep, 2013, September, Editor | Tagged | Leave a comment

Understanding Hypotonia

Diagnostic challenges should not delay clinical intervention
Hypotonia, or abnormally low muscle tone, is by itself not a disorder but a symptom of an enormous array of issues—many of which can be difficult to diagnose accurately. Even in the absence of a specific underlying diagnosis, however, children with hypotonia can benefit from clinical intervention.

By Christina Hall Nettles

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Posted in 2013, Feature Article, September | 2 Comments

Gait: The Cornerstone of Intervention

Quantifying the effects of hypotonia starts in the clinic
Effective management of children with hypotonia requires an understanding of how the condition affects gait. Clinicians typically rely on their professional experience when discussing the effects of hypotonia on gait in pediatric patients, partly because they trust that experience, but also because so little research has actually elucidated these effects.

By Cary Groner

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Posted in 2013, Feature Article, September | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Orthotic Solutions for Children with Hypotonia

New research underscores years of positive clinical results
When it comes to orthotic management of pediatric patients with hypotonia, the medical literature is only beginning to document the effectiveness that clinicians have been reporting anecdotally for years.

By Cary Groner

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Posted in 2013, Feature Article, September | Leave a comment

Orthotic success stories: Four cases in a series

Each child in this case series was assessed every other week for 16 weeks to determine mastery of items 23, 26-28, 30-39, and 41 (ranging from “pull to stand” to “walk fast”) on the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale. Test instructions were modified as needed for children to understand them. Parents were included in each session and encouraged to play with the child in order to demonstrate the targeted skills. Graphs illustrate age of mastery for each item number for the hypotonic child compared to a “typical” child, with linear trend lines illustrating rate of change, and demonstrate the improved mastery of skills after prescription of supramalleolar orthoses (SMOs). The cases will be presented in September at the O&P World Congress in Orlando, FL.

By Megan Smith, CO

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Posted in 2013, Feature Article, September | Leave a comment

Energy efficiency with AFO use varies in cerebral palsy patients

Longer strides lead to increased work
Ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) are regularly prescribed to children with walking disabilities resulting from cerebral palsy, yet the effects of AFOs on energy recovery and work during gait are still unclear.

By Samantha Rosenblum

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Posted in Pediatric Clinical News, 2012, October | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Biomodel could help researchers optimize clubfoot brace design

Method includes complex rotations
A surrogate biomodel of a child’s lower extremities, in particular the ability to model movement along multiple axes of rotation, could help improve researchers’ biomechanical understanding of bracing for clubfoot.

By Emily Delzell

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Posted in Pediatric Clinical News, 2012, October | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis study reveals footcare information gap

Issues involve custom foot orthoses
A Scottish study suggests foot care in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) falls short because of poor access to care and negative perceptions about custom foot orthoses. Experts say those issues may be less prevalent in the US but emphasize the need to educate patients, parents, and referring clinicians about the benefits of lower extremity care.

By Larry Hand

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Posted in Pediatric Clinical News, 2012, October | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Early ACL surgery could lower risk of associated knee damage

Patterns mirror those seen in adults
Timing of reconstruction surgery after pediatric anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries seems to be related to the prevalence of meniscal and chondral injuries discovered during those surgeries, according to new research published in the September issue of The American Journal of Sports Medicine.

By Cary Groner

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Posted in Pediatric Clinical News, 2012, October | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Wearing athletic shoes affects some performance measures

Standing long jump distance improves
Research has recently begun to clarify footwear’s effects on gait and functional performance in children, but the broader implications of the findings remain a matter of debate.

By Cary Groner

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Posted in Pediatric Clinical News, 2012, October | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment